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Khao Sok

Khao Sok Macaque Breakfast

Posted on: July 6th, 2012 by bodhi

Khao Sok MacaqueKhao Sok Macaque Breakfast

It is just before noon and we are sitting upstairs in restaurant where my wife and two daughters are finishing a late breakfast. Suddenly there is a shaking of the upper tree branches and a family of long tailed Macaque climb down to forage for lunch (a small grouping of wild bananas by the river). This subspecies is often called the “crab eating” macaque because they are known to dip their long tails in the sea to fish for crab. We feel privileged to share this moment of a family meal with our primate neighbors.

 

Our Jungle House Chiewlarn Lake Trip

Posted on: May 8th, 2012 by bodhi

chiewlarn reservoirIt is 9:00 AM before the bus arrives to take us to Chiewlarn dam. It is my second day in Khao Sok and already I am excited to see what this region has to offer.

As we round the corner to the pier, I see an immense expanse of water painted crystal blue by the sky above. Hopping aboard a long tail boat, we depart for the floating raft house where we will spend the night. Though moving at high speed, the expanse of water lined with gigantic limestone cliffs seems to stretch lazily in the distance; there is only the splash of the water to remind us of our velocity.

Mountain Biking Khao Sok

Posted on: April 23rd, 2012 by bodhi

Biking Khao Sok

After 6 days of trekking, elephant riding, exploring a lake, hiking through caves, running and swimming, I decided on biking Khao Sok…

I rented a good mountain bike from Our Jungle House, and off I went.  Bodhi showed me the track to follow on google maps, and me being me, I nodded, pointed at the track and agreed on where I was going!!!  However, I didn’t really have a clue after the first turn.  I thought, “Brilliant, I am going to have a Goonies vs Jurassic Park experience!”  And that I did!

Lost in Translation – A Khao Sok Culture Experience

Posted on: March 27th, 2012 by bodhi

Phanom River Khao Sok CultureAn Experience of Khao Sok Culture.

In the late afternoon, after a wonderful canoe tour down the river, we were relaxing on the river bank with Lek, our friendly guide. Lek explained that he had grown up nearby, and it was one his favorite places to rest after a long day.

He explains that the river was different when he was growing up.  Much of the monoculture rubber farms and oil plantations have caused erosion of the banks to fill in the river.

Tubing Khao Sok during the Dry Season

Posted on: March 20th, 2012 by bodhi

Tubing Khao Sok during the Dry Season 

Flooding means Fun!

Tubing Khao Sok

We have been staying at Our Jungle House for the last week.  It is the middle of dry season, the River Sok is running very low, usually no more than a foot deep in front of the lodge.  Guests have inquired about the possibility of tubing Khao Sok, but the seasoned staff have had to be party poopers:  “Oh no, you can’t go tubing. The water is too shallow. Sorry!”  The last few days have seen thunderstorms every afternoon, with impressively soaking rains.  Yet the river has not risen significantly.  Last night we had another heavy storm, but this time the river surged up many feet.  Perhaps the previous rains had saturated the ground.  Perhaps it is related to upstream construction activity.

Exploring the Khao Sok Wararam Cave

Posted on: March 12th, 2012 by bodhi

Mouth of Khao Sok wararam CaveThe appearance of the mouth of the Khao Sok’s Wararam cave signals an imminent entrance into another world.  I feel an anticipatory tension.

We gingerly climb up the muddy rampart into the mouth of Khao Sok’s wararam cave, and turn around.  We are now inside looking out; the cave frames the jungle and creates a startling view.  The horizon is dominated by jagged karst peaks wreathed in clouds.  The jungle unfolds before us.  And all around us is the cave.

Khao Sok Ecotourism – How to make a difference when you travel

Posted on: March 6th, 2012 by bodhi

Bodhi works in Khao Sok Ecotourism  A Discussion of Khao Sok Ecotourism

 By Kaisen and Lisa Betts-Lacroix

In this interview, Our Jungle House’s manager offers his view on the following questions:

What exactly is “ecotourism”?

How can people outside from the area learn to help?

How do we know where our money is best spent?

 

An excerpt is below, and you can read the full interview here.

You can also read more about Our Jungle House’s commitment to sustainability here


Kaizen: So what exactly is “ecotourism”?

A Geologist’s dream: Khao Sok Natural History

Posted on: February 27th, 2012 by bodhi

             … reflections from Dakota, a geologist in training: Khao Sok Natural History

Travelling to Thailand for the first time, following friendly connections, we reached Our Jungle House in January 2012. I am writing from Khao Sok national park at Our Jungle House. Bodhi, the manager here, is a pretty solid dude with exceptional skills in free styling to some ukulele jams.

As a college student currently learning Geology and Geological Engineering, my studies in college have proven to be incredibly useful here observing Khao Sok natural history.

Typing the name of the park into Google images will yield stunning photos of the huge, high standing monoliths that have intrigued us so much since we’ve been here.

Khao Sok Motorcycle Madness and Reflections on Development

Posted on: February 15th, 2012 by bodhi

Khao Sok Motorcylce
From a recent guest…

Khao Sok Motorcycle Reflections

Many concerned locals in Phuket thought we were completely mad driving a Honda Click 250km in the middle of the night from Phuket to Khao Sok….

We shall call the midnight journey to Khao Sok by motorcycle a “bonding experience” and both really enjoyed the entire trip, sore backsides and all. Insects feel like golfballs on your cheeks at 80km/hr. Two full tanks and a 5 litre Vixol bottle filled with gasoline will see you through…

Rediscovering Thai Dance at Khao Sok School

Posted on: February 5th, 2012 by bodhi 1 Comment

Student from Khao Sok School Three kilometres from Our Jungle House, next to the highway that connects Takua Pa with Surathani is where the Khao Sok school is located.

Compared to the splendor of nearby resorts, the school has a rather unattractive environment but nevertheless is close enough for parents that cannot afford to send their kids to better schools out of town. 160 pupils age six and older study at the school every day. The teachers and parents would now very much like to build a nursery  within the school for the 4-6 year olds.